KC SmartPort Blog

<< Return to Blog List

2019 Supply Chain and Manufacturing Predictions

by Mary Rooney | Jan 08, 2019

With the new year, we see many predictions for what is going to occur in the supply chain and manufacturing industries. As always, there will be opportunities for the taking and challenges to overcome.  We have captured a summary of the top five 2019 supply chain and manufacturing predictions and trends from a number of published reports.

  1. Technology disruption and innovation: As we saw in 2018, there will be continued technology innovation in supply chain and manufacturing. Technologies that will continue to be a focus include: Artificial Intelligence, Blockchain, Robotics, Drones, IOT and 3D Printing - just to name a few. More.

  2. Workforce of the future: Companies need to be investing now to ensure that they are building a workforce of the future. 2019 will see increased investment in digital training, both internally and in partnership with centers of education, such as universities and accelerators. More.

  3. Continued uncertainty with Global Trade: With ongoing tariffs, Brexit and other global trade agreements up in the air, companies will need to be nimble when it comes to managing supply and demand. Companies may start implementing technology that enables them to quickly adapt to new trade regulations, shift resource availability and import/export restrictions. More.

  4. Trucking capacity and costs: The ELD mandate, driver availability, a tight economy, high freight demand, low truck supply and other factors caused shipping costs to increase in 2018. This will likely continue into 2019, and some have predicted it could go on for a longer time frame. This may bring a new focus on carrier management functionality and technologies that supports this function. More.

  5. Increasing consumer demands: High consumer expectations about delivery and shipping of packages will continue to challenge retailers, carriers and logistics service providers, forcing fundamental changes to warehouse design and location, and driving up wages and competition for all types of supply chain labor. More.

Leave a comment

Share

Search

Archive

E-news

Media Coverage

Blog

Contact